Posted by: Isidora | May 4, 2013

And Her Temples Rise Once More

To follow up on last week’s post—and by way of tangible proof that Her temples still live—I’d like to share with you the Temple of Isis in my backyard. It is named the House of the Lotuses, Per Sushenu, or the Lotus Temple. It was built for an Isis Festival in 2010 and reconstructed in our backyard following the festival since nobody could bear to see it destroyed. Incidentally, that festival is the same one for which I originally instituted this blog. As you can see, both blog and temple are still going strong.

The Temple of Isis lives in so many of our hearts. I am extremely fortunate in that I also have one living in my backyard. With that, here’s a tour of the House of the Lotuses:

The House of the Lotuses; it is about the size of a large gazebo, which is how we explain it to the neighbors: it's an Egyptian gazebo!

The House of the Lotuses; it is about the size of a large gazebo, which is how we explain it to the neighbors: it’s an Egyptian gazebo!

The temple is decorated with glass lotuses, each cut by hand and cemented in place.

The temple is decorated with glass lotuses, each cut by hand and cemented in place.

One of two lotuses planters in front of the temple; this year, we have speedwell growing, other years, it was grasses

One of two lotus planters in front of the temple; this year, we have speedwell growing, in other years, it has been grasses

The roof of the temple is painted as Mother Nuet's starry belly

The roof of the temple is painted as Mother Nuet’s starry belly

There are eight large, outer pillars and two smaller inner lotus pillars supporting the temple; they are shiny because they were urethaned to withstand the Pacific Northwest rain

There are eight large outer pillars and two smaller inner pillars supporting the temple; they are shiny because they were urethaned to withstand the Pacific Northwest rain; yes, I had to have my coffee with me!

A single lotus pillar; that purple bit you see behind it, is the grape arbor of Dionysos

A single lotus pillar; that bit of purple you see behind it, is the grape arbor of Dionysos

Another shot of the lotus pillars, Nuet's sky, and the glass decoration on the top of the temple

Another shot of the lotus pillars, Nuet’s sky, and the glass decoration on the top of the temple

The shrine area, is illuminated with the rays of The Radiant One and white lotuses

The inner shrine area is illuminated with the rays of The Radiant One and decorated with delicate purple and white lotuses

The copper repouse shrine doors slide open so that the standing Isises guard the sacred image within

The copper repousé shrine doors slide open so that the winged Isises guard the sacred image within

The Radiant Isis in Her shrine

The Radiant Isis in Her shrine

A side view of the House of Lotuses

A side view of the House of Lotuses

Coincidence? I think not.

Philae-Portland, Portland-Philae. Coincidence? I think not.

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Responses

  1. Just stunning, but from the creator of Isis Magic its perfectly right!

  2. Fabulous Isidora, I hope some day I can create something even half as good. Thank you for sharing that with us.

  3. […] And Her Temples Rise Once More […]

  4. Beautiful.

  5. Truly amazing!

  6. Gorgeous! I want one in my yard. 😉

  7. Reblogged this on The Darkness in the Light and commented:
    Perfection — thank you so very much, for sharing your backyard temple with everyone!

  8. Reblogged this on Shadows of the Sun and commented:
    A truly amazing temple for a mighty Goddess.

  9. So insanely gorgeous. Thank you!!!

  10. This is a stunningly beautiful temple. It’s a wonderful blend on modern elements, but still very much in keeping with ancient design.

  11. Reblogged this on lingib1960 and commented:
    Absolutely stunning!

  12. This is beautiful, both in its minutia and the grand…feel to it. Well done!

  13. Oh my!! I should love to have a temple, to receive my daily offerings, situated in my backyard! This is truly lovely!!

  14. That is amazing! I’m filing this away as something to aspire to. I’m not a worshipper of Isis but it inspires me nonetheless.

  15. That’s beautiful.

  16. Gorgeous!

  17. Reblogged this on Sihathor's Open-Air Temple and commented:
    By the gods…so beautiful…! ;_;

  18. When i think of how much I contributed to the creation of this temple, it makes my soul sing with memories, and wish we had a builders list to sell so others might enjoy the same beauty within their own yardens! >^.^<
    Em Hotep
    Ma'Aleta SatSachmet

  19. […] Yes, I agree it is manipulative. But this is not a relationship between humans. Manipulating their devotees is how a deity acts on the world. Think about the great temples built where this or that deity was said to be born. How did they get built? Once somebody went to that place, and heard that story for the first time. Some individual. Speaking directly to Deity. Nebt-Het wants me to spend all my money on Her! says a whole city. We are not that far into a rennaisance of religious plurality, but we are moving closer. […]

  20. Awe-inspiring! Thank you so much for sharing

  21. I was and am so honored to have a part in its creation.
    Raya

  22. That temple is so amazing. I spent some time on the painting crew during construction and like Raya, am just honored to have been able to be part of it. I am truly blessed to have access to encounter the Goddess at that temple. It is an example of how Isis is not just a Goddess of the Ancients but Her worship is a living religion today.

  23. Truly magnificent! May pilgrims visit? And worship?

    • Well, if you’re ever in the Portland Oregon area, get in touch 😉

  24. Do you have instructions for those of us looking to start something like this?

    • Not really…this was all the genius of temple builder and his crew. I can give you a hint on the pillars: they are molds for pouring concrete with lightweight plastic flowerpots on top and a steel rod through the middle that attaches to top and bottom of the temple.

  25. May Aset bless all who worked on making this beautiful temple a reality!
    It stands as an inspiration to all worshippers of the Netjeru of ancient Egypt.
    If anyone would like to see the ritual for Aset that we celebrate in the various Reconstructionist temples, I would be happy to provide it.
    Just send me an email thru our website kemetictemple.org.
    It is obvious that the new temple is a work of great love. May it endure “for millions of years!”
    Richard Reidy

  26. This is so, so beautiful! Not only aesthetically, but also in that you are blessed enough to have what so many Kemetics dream of. Nekhtet!

  27. […] a shrine should have its own room, if not its own temple, but such an arrangement is lamentably not possible for most solitary Kemetics. I keep my Kemetic […]

  28. […] living all over the world) to build temples for our Gods (though some of us have managed some pretty extraordinary temple feats regardless), but that does not stop us from giving Them smaller places within our own homes, atop […]

  29. What a beautiful piece of devotional artwork.Absolutely love it.I thought I was one of the only ones with an actual physical temple to use. I built a temple to Het Her on my property that covers about 1/4 acre in a clearing in the woods. Made out of molded concrete, it will last for hundreds of years, however it is not nearly as colorful and polished as your jewel to Isis is. Great to see more projects such as this being built.


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